Jan 26 2014

tearsfourwater:

Too much love on my tongue.

I am speaking to you.

Too much thought on my lips.
I am thinking of you.

Too much lust in my eyes.
I am seeing your skin.

Too much wrath in my pride.
I am scattered inside.

Too much patience in my fingertips.
I am trying to reach forever too.

(via iknownothingisalliknow)

shadowstookshape:

Extract from the excellent 1992 documentary, Black Sci-Fi, produced and directed by Terrence Francis for Moonlight Films and broadcast on BBC2 as part of the Birthrights series.

The documentary focuses on Black science fiction in literature, film and television and features interviews with Octavia Butler, Samuel R. Delany, Mike Sergeant, Steven Barnes and Nichelle Nichols. 

In this extract, Octavia Butler discusses how her interest in science fiction developed and the genre’s potential for exploring new ideas and ways of being.

toussiant (snippet)

"…
TOUSSAINT L’OUVERTURE
became my secret lover at the age of 8
i entertained him in my bedroom
widda flashlight under my covers
way inta the night/ we discussed strategies
how to remove white girls from my hopscotch games
& etc.
…”

studioafrica:

THE WOMEN OF AFROFUTURIST SOUND by Kareem Reid (westindians)
These women are just a few examples of pioneers in contemporary art and culture that offer unique perspectives on the multi-narratives and realities of black femininity. They often re-appropriate and challenge mainstream representations of black female bodies, sexuality and desire. Emphasis is placed on the inherently fluid nature of their identities and often present themselves as aliens or androids to communicate their “otherness”, a common thematic trend among Afrofuturist artists.
Betty Davis and Grace Jones in the 70s and 80s preceded the huge commercial success of many acts of the 90s; particularly girl group TLC, Janet Jackson, Missy Elliott and cult favourites Aaliyah and Kelis played key roles in bringing Afrofuturist aesthetics to the forefront of popular culture.
The rise of emerging artists Janelle Monae,THEESatisfaction, Solange, Kelela and Moko are encouraging signs of a new wave of enigmatic performance artists charged with the double-objective of making us dance as well as think.
studioafrica:

THE WOMEN OF AFROFUTURIST SOUND by Kareem Reid (westindians)
These women are just a few examples of pioneers in contemporary art and culture that offer unique perspectives on the multi-narratives and realities of black femininity. They often re-appropriate and challenge mainstream representations of black female bodies, sexuality and desire. Emphasis is placed on the inherently fluid nature of their identities and often present themselves as aliens or androids to communicate their “otherness”, a common thematic trend among Afrofuturist artists.
Betty Davis and Grace Jones in the 70s and 80s preceded the huge commercial success of many acts of the 90s; particularly girl group TLC, Janet Jackson, Missy Elliott and cult favourites Aaliyah and Kelis played key roles in bringing Afrofuturist aesthetics to the forefront of popular culture.
The rise of emerging artists Janelle Monae,THEESatisfaction, Solange, Kelela and Moko are encouraging signs of a new wave of enigmatic performance artists charged with the double-objective of making us dance as well as think.
studioafrica:

THE WOMEN OF AFROFUTURIST SOUND by Kareem Reid (westindians)
These women are just a few examples of pioneers in contemporary art and culture that offer unique perspectives on the multi-narratives and realities of black femininity. They often re-appropriate and challenge mainstream representations of black female bodies, sexuality and desire. Emphasis is placed on the inherently fluid nature of their identities and often present themselves as aliens or androids to communicate their “otherness”, a common thematic trend among Afrofuturist artists.
Betty Davis and Grace Jones in the 70s and 80s preceded the huge commercial success of many acts of the 90s; particularly girl group TLC, Janet Jackson, Missy Elliott and cult favourites Aaliyah and Kelis played key roles in bringing Afrofuturist aesthetics to the forefront of popular culture.
The rise of emerging artists Janelle Monae,THEESatisfaction, Solange, Kelela and Moko are encouraging signs of a new wave of enigmatic performance artists charged with the double-objective of making us dance as well as think.
studioafrica:

THE WOMEN OF AFROFUTURIST SOUND by Kareem Reid (westindians)
These women are just a few examples of pioneers in contemporary art and culture that offer unique perspectives on the multi-narratives and realities of black femininity. They often re-appropriate and challenge mainstream representations of black female bodies, sexuality and desire. Emphasis is placed on the inherently fluid nature of their identities and often present themselves as aliens or androids to communicate their “otherness”, a common thematic trend among Afrofuturist artists.
Betty Davis and Grace Jones in the 70s and 80s preceded the huge commercial success of many acts of the 90s; particularly girl group TLC, Janet Jackson, Missy Elliott and cult favourites Aaliyah and Kelis played key roles in bringing Afrofuturist aesthetics to the forefront of popular culture.
The rise of emerging artists Janelle Monae,THEESatisfaction, Solange, Kelela and Moko are encouraging signs of a new wave of enigmatic performance artists charged with the double-objective of making us dance as well as think.
studioafrica:

THE WOMEN OF AFROFUTURIST SOUND by Kareem Reid (westindians)
These women are just a few examples of pioneers in contemporary art and culture that offer unique perspectives on the multi-narratives and realities of black femininity. They often re-appropriate and challenge mainstream representations of black female bodies, sexuality and desire. Emphasis is placed on the inherently fluid nature of their identities and often present themselves as aliens or androids to communicate their “otherness”, a common thematic trend among Afrofuturist artists.
Betty Davis and Grace Jones in the 70s and 80s preceded the huge commercial success of many acts of the 90s; particularly girl group TLC, Janet Jackson, Missy Elliott and cult favourites Aaliyah and Kelis played key roles in bringing Afrofuturist aesthetics to the forefront of popular culture.
The rise of emerging artists Janelle Monae,THEESatisfaction, Solange, Kelela and Moko are encouraging signs of a new wave of enigmatic performance artists charged with the double-objective of making us dance as well as think.
studioafrica:

THE WOMEN OF AFROFUTURIST SOUND by Kareem Reid (westindians)
These women are just a few examples of pioneers in contemporary art and culture that offer unique perspectives on the multi-narratives and realities of black femininity. They often re-appropriate and challenge mainstream representations of black female bodies, sexuality and desire. Emphasis is placed on the inherently fluid nature of their identities and often present themselves as aliens or androids to communicate their “otherness”, a common thematic trend among Afrofuturist artists.
Betty Davis and Grace Jones in the 70s and 80s preceded the huge commercial success of many acts of the 90s; particularly girl group TLC, Janet Jackson, Missy Elliott and cult favourites Aaliyah and Kelis played key roles in bringing Afrofuturist aesthetics to the forefront of popular culture.
The rise of emerging artists Janelle Monae,THEESatisfaction, Solange, Kelela and Moko are encouraging signs of a new wave of enigmatic performance artists charged with the double-objective of making us dance as well as think.

studioafrica:

THE WOMEN OF AFROFUTURIST SOUND by Kareem Reid (westindians)

These women are just a few examples of pioneers in contemporary art and culture that offer unique perspectives on the multi-narratives and realities of black femininity. They often re-appropriate and challenge mainstream representations of black female bodies, sexuality and desire. Emphasis is placed on the inherently fluid nature of their identities and often present themselves as aliens or androids to communicate their “otherness”, a common thematic trend among Afrofuturist artists.

Betty Davis and Grace Jones in the 70s and 80s preceded the huge commercial success of many acts of the 90s; particularly girl group TLCJanet JacksonMissy Elliott and cult favourites Aaliyah and Kelis played key roles in bringing Afrofuturist aesthetics to the forefront of popular culture.

The rise of emerging artists Janelle Monae,THEESatisfaction, Solange, Kelela and Moko are encouraging signs of a new wave of enigmatic performance artists charged with the double-objective of making us dance as well as think.

(via shadowstookshape)

“I hope i dont become old and bitter. And if i am bitter i hope i am bitter for the right reasons. - Tea”
— Suninvirgo.tumblr.com

awritersruminations:

Tina Chang: Do you think that absence has a presence, too?

Li-Young Lee: I love that question. I’ve been thinking about something for a long time, and I keep noticing that most human speech—if not all human speech—is made with the outgoing breath. This is the strange thing about presence and…

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(via revolutionizeed)

"January,"  Cynthia Cruz 

Avi. “Dark on me sunny day.”